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ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. -- Buffalo Bills running back LeSean McCoy publicly responded for the first time Wednesday Ken Boyer Authentic Jersey to Hall of Fame quarterback Jim Kelly's sharp criticism this week of McCoy's protest during Sunday's national anthem. "Like I texted him, he said some things to the media that he probably could have said to me," McCoy said. "But his opinion, it really doesn't matter to me. I like Jim Kelly. He texts me and I just told him, 'Hey, you're human.' People have their own opinions. What you said, you don't have to apologize for it. I don't think you're wrong. That's how he felt. I understand. You're human and I told him exactly, 'My respect for you, it hasn't changed. It's still very high.' He's a hell of a player and I respected him when I met him, and even the relationship I have so far. So it didn't affect me at allMcCoy was one of about a dozen Bills players to kneel during the national anthem before the Bills' win over the Denver Broncos. In the wrong way. I was upset and I was frustrated. That's the way I wanted to express myself at the game. I took a knee. I started stretching. I was angry. I was hurt, just like I said after the game. Somebody like our president, being our leader of this country, where millions and millions and millions of people look at America and see the type of words and things he's saying about us. I mean, it just got to me. It really didAt least two Bills players, cornerback Shareece Wright and wide receiver Kaelin Clay, told ESPN on Wednesday they will continue to kneel during the national anthem this Sunday against the Atlanta Falcons. Three players -- linebacker Lorenzo Alexander, as well as defensive ends Ryan Davis and Shaq Lawson -- told ESPN they will stand Sunday, although Davis said he will neither put his hand over his heart nor sing the anthem. Other players, including McCoy and defensive tackle Marcell Dareus, were undecided Wednesday about their plans. "Every week may http://www.officialcardinalsbaseball.com/authentic-16-kolten-wong-jersey.html be different," McCoy said Wednesday. "Because at the end of the day, man, we play football. We're a football team. We talk about being together as a country. It's the same thing as this team. We want to be together. It's OK to express your feelings a different way. But I don't want to make it where every week we're addressing this, every practice we're addressing this, taking away from our job. Because on that field, man, it's go. Them guys on defense are trying to hit us hard and trying to be physical with us. So we want to make sure that we're mentally focused on the job at hand. And we play together, and we're focused." McCoy said his teammates have been talking more about football during meetings this week compared to last Saturday, when the locker room was "amazed" at Trump's comments about NFL playersHowever, on Monday, defensive end Jerry Hughes delivered a passionate rebuke of Kelly's reaction to the Bills' anthem protests Before that magical September night in the Rose Bowl, Rosen's career at UCLA was known best for bold statements and brash social media posts. Rosen had never shied away from sharing himself and his opinions with the public, whether posting a video of his dorm-room hot tub as a freshman or wearing a hat with an obscene message meant for Donald Trump -- while golfing at a Trump golf course. His antics inspired a Sports Illustrated cover in August 2016 that read, in part, "Big Arm? Big Mouth?" and later prompted UCLA head coach Jim Mora to ask Rosen if he wanted to be football flameout Johnny Manziel or Tom Brady LOS ANGELES -- Josh Rosen quietly reconnected this summer with http://www.officialcardinalsbaseball.com/authentic-31-lance-lynn-jersey.html his most notable skeptic: Trent Dilfer, the theatrically opinionated former NFL quarterback who in recent years has reinvented himself as a youth quarterback guru. Their reconciliation came during the Elite 11 competition for the nation's top high school quarterbacks, three years after their first encounter there when Dilfer fumed about Rosen's resistance to his training methods. Dilfer's frustration with the aggressively inquisitive Rosen would become the top storyline of the Elite 11 documentary broadcast months later. "Josh, you were the most talked about person this week by far," Dilfer said in the penultimate scene of the show. "Everybody keeps coming back [to], 'Does he think he knows more than us?' " Rosen, then generally considered the nation's top quarterback in the Class of 2015, finished last among the 11 quarterbacks chosen in the finaleAt the invitation of the Elite 11 organizers, Rosen returned in June as one of the college counselors for the high-profile camp. Dilfer was impressed Rosen accepted the offer, a hint at a thaw in their relationship. By the time the camp was over, Dilfer had become as much a fan of Rosen the man as he was the quarterback. "I have nothing but good things to say about him," Dilfer said. "I've grown to appreciate how he's aware of his impact, his words, his influence, and he's aware of his talent and how good he can be." Rosen's growth between those Elite 11s -- from local phenom to star quarterback at UCLA -- was the theme of his address to the teen prodigies in attendance, a tale that included the highs and the lows of the past three years. He was, to Dilfer and the camp organizers, a model alumnus.
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